Things are about to get a little steamy

Now, now.. Don’t you go thinking the worst! This is a family blog ūüôā

I am 7 weeks post surgery now and 6¬†3/4 weeks into my committment to permanently change my family’s lifestyle.

So far accomplished:

  • Water source improved and water consumption increased.
  • Soda pop reduced to a rare treat.
  • Juice as fresh as possible (though we mourn the demise of our standard issue juicer and are saving up for an industrial one).
  • Whole grains, seeds and nuts are a part of the daily diet and we are slowly replacing all those refined flour favourites with whole grain replacements.
  • Vegetables are a bigger part of our diet, and we¬†are slowly getting everyone in the family on board. Even my darling Veggie-hater son is slowly coming around (slowly, mind you!).
  • Small container garden¬†has been¬†planted and is¬†producing. First harvest of leafy greens is just around the corner.
  • Take-aways and convenience foods, are almost completely eliminated. I say almost because I have promised the kids that we are about changing our daily diet – and a very occasional pizza or chicken burger is allowed.
  • Red meat consumption is down, and we’ve found a source of free-range, hormone and animal by-product free chicken (Yippee!)

It’s great to see progress… but there is still so much ahead.¬† This has been all about gradual change, so this isn’t discouraging.¬† However, I don’t want to lose momentum!

Next on my list is to buy a steamer (ah! now you get it!)  I have done a lot of reading about the nutrients in our food. Some information I knew already, some information gave me greater clarity

Interesting to note: the 3 main enemies to vitamins and minerals are heat, water and oxidation

Oxidation: Vitamins A, C and E are most prone to oxidation. The longer food is stored, the more surface area that is exposed to air and light, the less Vitamin C there is likely to be.  Vitamin A and E are also victims of oxidation. Cool, dark storage helps to slow this natural process.

Heat: The degree of destruction depends a) cooking time b) whether heat is distributed evenly and c) most importantly the temperature.  20-70% of the nutrient content of leafy vegetables is lost in cooking

Water: Minerals and water-soluble vitamins leach into cooking water. The more water used and the longer the cooking time, the more this will occur. High temperatures can even destroy some of the vitamins, though not the minerals. Loss of nutrients in boiled foods tends to be around 20-50%.

Why steam? Steamed foods tend to keep the temperature at the core of the food lower for longer, retaining more of the vitamin and mineral content in the food. It doesn’t take much water to accomplish the cooking process – and anyone who has had steamed broccoli and carrots over boiled know the colour and flavour are so much stronger.

Why not microwave? In vegetables, there is little loss, because the microwaves vibrate the water content in the food. However, essential fats are rapidly destroyed, so it’s advised to not microwave foods with oils, nuts or sees.

Basically I feel that if I am going to the trouble to purchase organic food, grow what I can and keep my fridge stocked with fresh goodness – I want those precious nutrients! Our bodies need them – our cells demand them and I want to give my body all the fight it can have to ward off what attacks it.

Here are some great tips offered by Patrick Holford in his book The Optimum Nutrition Bible 

  • Eat foods as fresh and unprocessed as possible
  • Keep fresh food cool and in the dark in the fridge in sealed containers
  • Eat more raw food. (This is why I love juicing!)
  • Prepare foods cold where possible and heat to serve
  • Cook food whole as possible – saving slicing or blending before serving
  • Steam or boil with as little water as possible – and save that water for stock (Yum!)
  • Fry as little as possible and do not overcook, burn or brown your food